Tuesday, 21 February 2017

Single Market Act SMA

What did the EU institutions  do during the public hearing and the preparatory stage following the fifty proposals of the consultation paper (green paper):

For a highly competitive social market economy
50 proposals for improving our work, business and exchanges with one another
Brussels, 11.11.2010 COM(2010) 608 final/2 (45 pages)?  

I looked at the opinions from the Council, the European Council and the European Parliament in ten blog entries on my Finnish blog Eurooppaoikeus (beginning here), but on Grahnlaw we are going to fast-forward to a few remaining resources.

Regardless of your language choice the Commission’s  Single Market Act page has been trimmed down to offer you text and links to a few documents in English.

The access page to the original contributions to the public hearing, promised by the Commission Staff Working Paper (CSW), can not be found.

Regarding the contributions we are restricted to the 32 pages of the CSW published, in English only, on the same day as the Single Market Act (SMA) communication:



Single Market Act COM(2011) 206

By the time the European Commission published its 2011 Single Market Act (SMA) communication, it had pared down the fifty proposals of the green paper to a first wave of twelve priority measures (“levers”) intended for adoption by the end of 2012:
   
Twelve levers to boost growth and strengthen confidence
"Working together to create new growth"
Brussels, 13.4.2011 COM(2011) 206 final (26 pages)  
In practice, the Commission aimed at a second SMA a year later and the rest of the fifty proposals remained on the work programme (pages 4-5):

On the basis of the contributions made during the public debate, the views and conclusions of the European Parliament and Council, and the opinions of the Committee of the Regions and the European Economic and Social Committee, the Commission has identified twelve levers. In order to boost growth and reinforce citizens' confidence, the Commission proposes that the EU should adopt a key action for each lever by the end of 2012.

In 2011 the Commission will present the necessary legislative proposals for the implementation of those key actions, so that the Parliament and Council can respond to the invitation from the European Council to adopt a first series of priority measures to relaunch the single market by the end of 2012.

This priority-setting does not mean that the Commission is giving up on other actions identified in its Communication "Towards a Single Market Act" that will enable the Single Market to become the platform for growth and job creation. While responding to the urgent need to act for growth and jobs, the Action Plan is only a first step in that direction.

Work will have to continue and we should prepare as of now for the next step. The Commission will present further measures that respond to the needs identified and make a significant contribution to the relaunch of the Single Market. At the end of 2012 it will take stock of the progress of the current Action Plan and will present a programme for the next stage. All these measures together will provide a coherent political response to the gaps in the Single Market by presenting a model for sustainable, smart and inclusive growth in the framework of the Europe 2020 Strategy.
This was how the European Commission later wanted to commemorate and to highlight the benefits of 20 years of the European Single Market.


Ralf Grahn